THE LANTERIAN

A Weekly Mass Supplement

January 20, 2019 – Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

Prayer Before Mass

Receive, O Holy Trinity, One God, this Holy Sacrifice of the Body and Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, which I, Your unworthy servant, desire now to offer to Your Divine Majesty by the hands of this Your minister, with all the Sacrifices which have ever been or will be offered to You, in union with that most Holy Sacrifice offered by the same Christ our Lord at the Last Supper and on the Altar of the Cross.  I offer it to You with the utmost affection of devotion, out of pure love for Your infinite goodness, and according to the most holy intention of the same Christ our Lord, and of our Holy Mother the Church. O God, almighty and merciful, grant us through this Holy Sacrifice, joy and peace, a holier life, time to do penance, grace and consolation of the Holy Spirit, and perseverance in good works. Amen.

For the preparation I will think on what is about to take place on the altar between myself, the eternal Father, and his only begotten Son. I will form the intention and the application of the Mass.

Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Why Do We Do That? The Ministers of Matrimony

Every sacrament requires a minister to effect it and make it valid. Without the priest there is no Eucharist or absolution of sin. In the case of matrimony the ministers are the spouses. Sometimes it is thought that the priest or the deacon is the minister but he is actually the witness. The true ministers that make the sacrament of marriage happen are the man and the woman exchanging their vows. When the two give their consent and pronounce their vows to one another and to God they make the sacrament happen. The couple has the power to do this because of their baptism. Baptism empowers one to offer sacrifice to God and the greatest sacrifice is life itself. This doesn’t have to mean violent sacrifice as in the case of a martyr but the everyday martyrdom of married life. The sacrifices required in a marriage are priestly and should be joined to the ultimate sacrifice of the Jesus on the cross – and in this life that means the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. All married couples should attend Mass together as they realize concretely for each other the meaning of the Eucharist and are strengthened as ministers.

Catechesis: Mediatrix

Our Lady was given a role in salvation unique and singular, to be Mother of God and of the Church and all the redeemed. From the moment she gave consent to become the Mother of the Savior at the Annunciation she became a mediator for us. Her intercessory power is completely under Christ and is received as a gift. The very first miracle performed by Jesus was through Our Lady’s intercession at the wedding at Cana. It was then that Jesus first manifested his glory. He continues to manifest his glory in manifold ways and Mary continues to perform her role as mediator and Mother. As Vatican II stated: This motherhood of Mary in the order of grace continues uninterruptedly from the consent which she loyally gave at the Annunciation and which she sustained without wavering beneath the cross, until the eternal fulfillment of all the elect. Taken up to heaven she did not lay aside this saving office but by her manifold intercession continues to bring us the gifts of eternal salvation. Mary’s role in our lives is indispensable as she is The Woman with the Mediator.

Lectio Divina

“Do whatever he tells you.”  — John 2:5
Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy. Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated? These are the words of Mary. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. Do you have peace? What does Our Lady wish to convey to you? Why would Our Lady say this? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.
Have you taken the time to listen to what Jesus may be telling you? What might he be telling you at this time of your life? Can you ask Mary to help you listen with confidence to the Lord?
Ask the Holy Spirit, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

The Catholic Way

Weddings are among the most excited and wonderful experience in life. What makes a marriage different from every other type of relationship is the depth of intimacy and mutual commitment made by the man and woman. There are four components of a marriage that make it different from all other relationships. 1. Fidelity—The emotional, physical, spiritual and psychological intimacy of marriage belongs to the spouses exclusively. “You and none other.” 2. Openness to life—A sexual relationship that blocks life is not a marriage. While having children at any given moment is a matter of prudence, being open to life is essential in a marriage. 3. Mutual service— Spouses vow to one another that they live for the other, not for themselves. To love is ultimately not about feeling good all the time but about choosing the good of the spouse even if it temporarily may be difficult. 4. The Sacrament—The previous three are common to all marriages but the fourth is exclusive to Christians. Marriage is a sacrament, which means there is grace in it. Marriage makes the partners holy and prepares them to be saints. These four goals make a marriage.

The Friends of God: St. Agnes

Patron of: Young girls, chastity, sexual assault survivors

Feast Day: January 21

Agnes was a girl of 12 or 13 in the late 3rd century. As she was from a wealthy family and quite beautiful many men sought her hand in marriage. However, she had promised herself in perpetual chastity to Jesus. When one wealthy suitor was rebuffed by her he betrayed her to authorities as a Christian; it was still illegal in Rome at the time. She was arrested and urged to renounce her faith or face death or defilement. Remaining faithful to Jesus and to her chastity she refused. She was martyred in Rome. Her relics are venerated at her basilica in the Piazza Navona in Rome.

O glorious St. Agnes, you served God in humility and confidence on earth and are now in the enjoyment of His beatific Vision in heaven because you persevered till death and gained the crown of eternal life. Remember now the dangers that surround me in the vale of tears, and intercede for me in my needs and troubles. Amen.

On Marriage

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

God has placed me in this state of life; in this and no other I must serve him and be saved. All of the circumstances and events in mystate of life, for example the different dispositions I have to dealwith, the events that will take place, the times and places in which they will happen, manifest the order of Providence that the Lord has willed to save me. I have to adapt myself to all these things that happen to me, and not think I can force them to adapt to me. In fact, I will always try to adapt with peace and joy of heart, convinced that God knows better than I what is best suited for my good. My principal care will be to win the affection of my spouse. Therefore, it will be my concern and consolation to please him/her in everything. In fact, I will be particularly attentive to his innocent inclinations so as to anticipate and satisfy them when with him.

January 13, 2019 – Baptism of the Lord

Why Do We Do That? The Formula for Baptism

Human beings are both material and spiritual. We posses bodies and we posses souls. In the same way the sacraments have both a physical/material aspect and a spiritual component. The physical component of a sacrament is the material thing needed for the action. In Anointing of the Sick the material thing is oil. In priesthood it is a man. In marriage is a man and a woman. In Baptism the material thing is water. The spiritual component is the words spoken by the minister(s) celebrating the sacrament. In baptism the words are, “I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” This formula is absolutely essential and necessary for the sacrament to take place. Without those words there is no sacrament just as there could not be a baptism without water, as if speaking the words without pouring the water of the head makes a   baptism happen. Under normal circumstances only a bishop, priest or deacon should baptize someone. In an emergency though, say if someone were in immediate danger of death, anyone can baptize validly by using water and the proper formula.

Catechesis: Baptism

Baptism is the first and most necessary of all the sacraments. It is the gateway to salvation and to all the other sacraments. Through it the guilt of original sin is removed and one is made a child of God and incorporated into the Body of Christ. Without baptism, no one is able to be admitted to any other sacrament. There is within the Tradition of the Church the idea of baptism by desire. This would refer to someone who is not sacramentally and physically baptized but who would receive it if he or she were to know how necessary it is and who truly desire to be in union with God. If this baptism by desire exists then why would the Church insist that physical water baptism is necessary? Baptism of desire is something that can only be known by God. The Church can   never know with certainty that anyone has baptism by   desire. We can know for sure that water baptism does in fact work because our Lord has promised such.  Furthermore, it is water baptism that admits one to the other sacraments, especially penance and eucharist. It is the difference between desiring to participate and actually participating.

Lectio Divina

The Lord will bless his people with peace.” — Psalm 29

 Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.

Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?

These are the words of God. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. Do you have peace? What does the psalm say about how to come about peace? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart. What makes us His people? Do you desire to be His? Can you tell the Lord now about your desire for peace?

Ask the Holy Spirit, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

The Catholic Way

Usually on the Tuesday of Holy Week the bishop blesses the holy oils at the Chrism Mass. One of the three oils blessed is the Chrism Oil. This oil is used in three sacraments: Baptism, Confirmation and Holy Orders. Since Chrism is used for these three they must have something important in common. What they have in common is priesthood. A baptized person joins the priesthood of all the faithful. Being a priest, the believer is able to offer sacrifice. For the layman this sacrifice is his or her life in being faithful to God in all the moments of life. In Confirmation one becomes a priest for others, offering the sacrifice of working for the salvation of others. In Holy Orders one becomes an ordained priest (or bishop) and thus able to offer the sacrifice of the Holy Eucharist, which unites and perfects all other sacrifices. In the end, all three sacraments point to the supreme sacrament of the   Eucharist, the perfect sacrifice of Christ the High Priest. Chrism oil is also used in the consecration of a new altar upon which the supreme sacrifice is offered.

The Friends of God: St. Anthony, Abbot

Patron of: Animals, Farmers

Feast Day: January 17

Anthony sold off his possessions and left resources to provide for his younger sister, then he fled into the desert to seek union with God without distraction. In the desert Anthony had to deal with the temptations of lust, boredom, sloth, anger and many others. Persevering, Anthony found holiness and the union with God he sought so passionately. Monks and nuns who leave behind the world to focus on the spiritual life leave behind for the rest of us a map of the soul that we too might make out journey to God.

Dear God, St. Anthony the Abbot accepted your call to renounce the world and to love you above all things. He faithfully served you in the solitude of the desert by fasting, prayer, humility and good works. In the Sign of the Cross, he triumphed over the devil. Through his intercession, may we learn to love you better, with all our hearts, all our souls, all our minds, all our strength, and to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. St. Anthony the Abbot, great and powerful saint, intercede for us also for this special request…. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with God the Father and the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever. Amen.

On Prayer

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

In the order of divine providence, the more necessary the means to salvation, the more God renders it easy to practice. Thus among the sacraments, there is nothing easier than Baptism; the matter is simply water, the minister any person, and it can be administered at any place, time, or age. So too one can pray in any place, at home, while traveling, in bed, at any time during the day or night, without sublimity of thought or elegance of style. Rather “He hath had  regard to the prayer of the humble, and he hath not despised their petition” (Ps 101:18).

It is not necessary to wait for an audience, to seek out mediators, to study expressions. We ourselves are the temple of God. The heart is the altar where prayers reside and are welcome, without which it opens to others or interferes there with our hearing God.

January 6, 2019 – Feast of the Epiphany

Why Do We Do That? Candles

An epiphany is a manifestation of divine power. In the face of Christ God himself is manifested. Jesus is the light of the world as he has unveiled the full truth about God and his kingdom. On the solemnity of the Epiphany we celebrate his manifestation to all the nations, represented by the visit of the Magi. He is now the light of all nations. The Church continues to utilize candles at all of its liturgies to symbolize the light of Christ. In the modern age of electricity there is no practical need for candle light. But the power of a flame burning a candle for the glory of God remains a powerful reminder that the light of Christ is deeper and truer than all other lights. We continue to use candles also as a reminder that the there are Catholics who must hide in the darkness of the underground to celebrate the Eucharist. Their perseverance through persecution keeps the flame of faith alive for us through the mystical Body of Christ. We must always remain vigilant and watchful for the day of the Lord.

 

Catechesis: The Economy of Salvation

In his letter to the Ephesians, St. Paul mentions his stewardship of God’s grace as something already known by the Church. Stewardship is basically being a manager or supervisor in service to an organization. Paul is claiming to be a caretaker of grace. Salvation happens in an economy. Just as in monetary economics, salvation has production, distribution, trade and consumption. Grace happens in an economy and, in normal circumstances, in a systematic way. Grace comes to us from God through a series of mediations. The One supreme mediator is Jesus Christ. His birth into the human family made his humanity (particularly his body) a sacrament — an instrument for God to distribute his manifold graces to us. From Christ flows the seven sacraments of the Church and all of the devotions that prepare us for them. St. Paul and all of the Apostles were the original stewards of this system of graces. The bishops are now properly the stewards of this grace. Just as a monetary economy must have a market through which to work, so too does salvation require the “marketplace” of the Church.

Lectio Divina

“They were overjoyed at seeing the star, and on entering the house they saw the child with Mary his mother.”  -Matthew 2:10-11
Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.
Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?
These are the words of God. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. Do you experience any joy over the birth of Christ? What have you been experiencing this Christmas? Have you found Jesus and Mary at all this Christmas season? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.

The holy Family found a house to welcome them. Is that true of your home? What do you wish to offer the newborn King? Ask the Holy Spirit, in your
heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

The Catholic Way

Epiphany blessing is a simple way to witness to your visitors and to the neighbors that the light of Christ has reached you and your home and that you will extend that blessing and welcome to all those who visit in this new year of grace.

Use blessed chalk to write the following above or near the doors of the home: 20 + C + M + B + 19. The numbers represent the year 2019. CMB represents two things:

1. The initials of the three Magi who are traditionally named Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar.

2. The Latin phrase for a home blessing is Christus Mansionem Benedictat.

While writing pray: The three Wise Men, Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar followed the star of God’s Son who became human two thousand and fifteen years ago. May Christ bless our home and remain with us throughout the new year. Amen
Visit, O blessed Lord, this home with the gladness of your presence. Bless all who live or visit here with the gift of your love; and grant that we may manifest your love to each other and to all whose lives we touch. May we grow in grace and in the knowledge and love of you; guide, comfort, and strengthen us in peace, O Jesus Christ, now and forever.

The Friends of God: St. Aelred of Rievaulx

Patron saint of: Bladder stone sufferers
Feast Day: January 12

Aelred was a monk and abbot of the Cistercian tradition in 12th century England. He was a man of great erudition and an exemplary teacher. He is most known for his writing on Friendship. Aelred was particularly devoted to helping his monks and other readers to know how Christians should live out their friendship as the truest form of love. For him friendship meant shared love in both divine and secular things where each person shares, listens, gives and receives.
O God, who gave the blessed Abbot Aelred the grace of being all things to all men, grant that, following his example, we may so spend ourselves in the service of one another, as to preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. Amen.

On Epiphany

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

Jesus Christ has chosen us to further his interests, to give currency to his maxims in taking up the defense of virtue against the pernicious ways of the world.

Jesus Christ is at the same time our way, our final end, our light, our food for the journey, our guide. Resemblance is the cause of love. You must imitate him if you want him to love you. He cherishes his friends in such a fashion that he wants to be at one with them. For this he has instituted the Sacrament of love in the form of flesh that is incorporated into the one who partakes of it, in order to unite himself bodily to us and to be only one, in a certain fashion, with unity of substance.

December 30, 2018 – Feast of the Holy Family

Why Do We Do That? Bible Readings at Mass

Through most of the year on Sundays and weekdays the first reading from the Mass is from the Old Testament. Over the course of a three-year period the Church organized readings so that we see the promises of God in the Old Testament and their ultimate fulfillment in Jesus in the New. This three-year period allows us to hear almost the entirety of the Bible.

During the seasons of Christmas and Easter, however, our first readings are often from the New Testament. At Christmas we hear the whole of St. John’s first letter as it replaces the Old Testament. This happens due to the special nature of the season. Because Christmas celebrates the birth of Jesus and the Word of God becoming flesh, John’s first letter is written to help us understand just what that means and the implications for our lives from this event. So, for the season of Christmas we absorb deeply just how profoundly and surprisingly God has delivered on the promises he made throughout history, the ones we hear about from the prophets through the year. What John has seen, heard and touched he must proclaim to us.

Catechesis: Lamb of God

When you hear the word “lamb”, what do you imagine? Usually modern audiences think of a cute little animal with fluffy wool, like a cloud. But John the Baptist was not speaking to a modern audience. His audience was Jewish, and when they heard the word “lamb” they thought of sacrifice. It was a lamb after all that was the sacrificial Passover meal that they ate, and still eat. John the Baptist is claiming that Jesus is the true Lamb of God. Christ will be the one who truly sacrifices himself for us that we may pass over sin and death and enter the promised land of God’s presence. He is the ‘Lamb” we eat at every Mass, the sacrificial meal that establishes communion with God and others. This is why we sing, “Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us,” before we receive holy communion. By our recitation of that title we are showing ourselves to be disciples with those who first heard John preach in the wilderness. We are the disciples who follow the Apostolic faith in the Lamb of God who has come to us and takes away all sin, replacing it with his mercy. Jesus is our true Passover and, in communion, we pass with him into the Promised Land.

Lectio Divina

“What are you looking for?”  –John 1:38

 Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.

Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?

These are the words of God. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. What are YOU looking for in your life? What has brought you to this Mass? What are you hoping for by believing in Jesus Christ and being in his Church? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.

Does this bring you comfort? Why would Jesus ask this question? Are you able to answer this question to Jesus himself in your prayer?? Ask the Holy Spirit, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

The Catholic Way

Family is the basic institution in the world. By institution the Church means a pattern of customs, behaviors, expectations and practices that have been established through many, many generations that is left for every member of society as a gift from descendants to help shape a persons character. St, John Paul II taught that family is a school of socialization that teaches children how to be human. There we are supposed to learn how to communicate, how to share, how to resolve disputes, how to cooperate, how to pray and how to deal with the outside world in a confident and constructive way. The family is the Domestic Church where one should first learn how to live out the faith in a practical way every day. Ultimately it is families that are the building blocks of society. If families are not strong, if they are not supported, if they are not complete, the society suffers. The Christmas season provides an ample time for families to connect, to heal wounds and to learn and establish traditions that can be passed from generation to generation, creating a bond between the past, present and future.

The Friends of God: St. Elizabeth Seton

Patron saint of: Problems with in-laws, widows, against the death of children, opposition by Church authorities

Feast Day: January 4

Elizabeth Ann Seton has the distinction of being the first American-born saint. She was a convert from a high-society, New York Episcopalian family. Her wealthy husbands business and health both failed and she eventually lost him and their wealth. After her entrance in the Church she moved to Baltimore and started a school for girls. It became one of the first in what would eventually become the Catholic school system in America.

Lord God, you blessed Elizabeth Seton with gifts of grace as wife and mother, educator and foundress, so that she might spend her life in service to your people. Through her example and prayers may we learn to express our love for you in love for our fellow men and women. We ask this through Christ our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

On the Goodness of Jesus

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

Jesus is a deep font of Goodness that not only contains eminently and in a most perfect way every good that is found in creatures but every good that can still be imagined, and every good that can not be imagined not only by humans and angels, but by God himself. Having said this, I no longer wonder when I see Jesus Christ infinitely humble in a stable, infinitely humiliating on the Cross among two thieves, Jesus Christ made for us food and drink; Jesus Christ does not despise those who despise him, does not offend those who offend him, but rather, offering himself as victim to his enemies, dies, so to say, at the feet of his enemies to give them life, for having received, as Son of God and as man, a kindness without limits. His heart suffers in a certain way if it is not yet communicated to us, and we raise his heart if we accept his grace; nor can we do to Jesus Christ anything more acceptable than this.

 

December 23, 2018 – Fourth Sunday of Advent

Why Do We Do That? The Christmas Proclamation

Traditionally, at the beginning of Midnight Mass, before the Gloria is sung, the Church makes a formal declaration of the birth of Christ. The proclamation situates the birth of Jesus within both salvation and secular history to demonstrate that God has entered into our time and altered it.

All of the events mentioned are connected to the Nativity and fulfilled by it. For example, the prophecy of Daniel is mentioned, so we come to understand that the birth of Jesus is the fulfillment of that prophecy.

It is quite common to proclaim a new birth. At the very least we send out letters, postcards, emails or texts to friends and family to announce the arrival of the little one. When the child born is of royal lineage the announcement is usually quite formal, even today the press is present to witness the announcement. So, the Church makes this solemn and formal announcement that God is King in Jesus Christ and all of history has been preparing for this event. With the birth of Jesus history has altered from time moving away from God to time heading straight toward him to culminate eventually in a great wedding feast.

Catechesis: The Incarnation

References to The Incarnation mean that God became a man in Jesus Christ. Essentially this means that Jesus is the most important Sacrament. He makes God, who is pure Spirit, visible to us in his human body, just as all the sacraments make the power of God visible to us through the sacramental sign.

One of the earliest debates in the Church’s history was over the proper understanding of the Incarnation. The first ecumenical council in Nicaea, from which we derive most of our Creed, was called in order to address this very issue. There would be several other councils called in the early centuries of Christianity to settle the issue for good.

Jesus Christ is one person. He is the Son of God, the second person of the Trinity, God from God and Light from Light, true God from true God, as we profess. But in the Incarnation he also took on a human nature to be like us in every way except sin. So, Jesus is also fully human. He is not half-human and half-divine; Jesus is fully human and fully divine. Being such is not a case of multiple personalities. He remains one person. Truly the Divine Person of the Son of God.

 

Lectio Divina

“Blessed are you who believed that what was spoken to you by the Lord would be fulfilled.”   — Luke 1:45

Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.

Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?

These are the word of God. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. Why is a believer blessed, as Elizabeth tells Mary? How is the Lord’s word fulfilled in the life of Mary? What is it that Mary believed? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.

Does this bring you comfort? What do you think he means? How have you been blessed through your belief in God’s word? Ask the Holy Spirit, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

 

The Catholic Way

Christmas is more than a day! We celebrate a season that lasts till the feast of the Baptism of the Lord on January 13. You will notice that the Christmas decorations remain up till then. The mystery of Christ’s life is not a one-day affair. God becoming a man is an event unparalleled in history. The world is a much different place since the birth of Jesus Christ. These events require an entire liturgical season to celebrate and remember.

Christmas Day itself is actually extended for 8 days, called the Octave of Christmas, encompassing two Sundays. The first 8 days of the Christmas season are considered as if one day in the liturgy. Throughout this octave and indeed throughout the whole season we hear in the readings at Mass how the birth of Christ has already started to change the world and the lives of those who surround Jesus, for both good and bad.

Continue to send your Christmas cards and extend Christmas greetings to everyone. The secular world starts Christmas after Halloween and ends it on December 25. The truth is, we are just beginning!

 

The Friends of God: St. Stephen

Patron saint of: Deacons, Altar Servers, headaches

Feast Day: December 26

St. Stephen was the first Christian to suffer a death for his witness to Christ. In his defense before the Sanhedrin, the Jewish Senate, St. Stephen argued lovingly that Jesus has fulfilled the promises of the Old Testament given through the prophets. With Christ, the full and true worship of God was now in established, which all peoples are invited to participate in through Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist. For his argument, Stephen was stoned to death with the approval of Saul. Stephen prayed at his death for his persecutors. A prayer that converted Saul and made him St. Paul.

O glorious saint, faithful imitator of Jesus Christ martyr in will and in reality, so full of charity, zeal, love, and purity, deign to intercede for us poor   exiles; you who are so high in the favor of God, we do entreat you to procure for us a little spark of that divine love which animated your heart, that we too one day may have the happiness of seeing our God face to face. Amen.

 

The Incarnation

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

Traditionally, at the beginning of Midnight Mass, before the Gloria is sung, the Church makes a formal declaration of the birth of Christ. The proclamation situates the birth of Jesus within both salvation and secular history to demonstrate that God has entered into our time and altered it.

All of the events mentioned are connected to the Nativity and fulfilled by it. For example, the prophecy of Daniel is mentioned, so we come to understand that the birth of Jesus is the fulfillment of that prophecy.

It is quite common to proclaim a new birth. At the very least we send out letters, postcards, emails or texts to friends and family to announce the arrival of the little one. When the child born is of royal lineage the announcement is usually quite formal, even today the press is present to witness the announcement. So, the Church makes this solemn and formal announcement that God is King in Jesus Christ and all of history has been preparing for this event. With the birth of Jesus history has altered from time moving away from God to time heading straight toward him to culminate eventually in a great wedding feast.

 

 

December 16, 2018 – Third Sunday of Advent

Why Do We Do That?

Rose Vestments

Gaudete Sunday is the third Sunday of Advent. The color used in the Mass is changed from violet to rose. The reason for the change is to express joy and the coming of the Lord at Christmas. Gaudete is Latin for joy or rejoice. The second reading in the Mass from St. Paul’s letter to the Philippians admonishes us to rejoice. He does not give us a suggestion; it is an imperative: Rejoice! How can Paul command us to rejoice? He can do so because the Lord has come and given himself as a gift to us making it possible to become his children. There is no greater dignity, no greater victory than to be a child of God and heir to his kingdom. The birth of Jesus Christ into our world has made all of that possible. God is with us!

Rejoicing is necessary when the Lord is near. The previous two weeks of Advent have had readings at Mass that focused on judgment and the coming of the Lord at the end of the world. Now the focus of the reading changes from this point on to the expectation of the Nativity. We should feel the excitement of knowing that Christmas is so close and God has come to be with his people. The change of color to rose provides and outward sign of this shift from penance to joy.

 

Catechesis: Daughter of Zion

There are several references from the prophets in the Old Testament to daughter Zion. This refers to Israel in its purest and most ideal form, exhibiting the faith of Abraham. Abraham trusted God on Zion when he was prepared to offer his son Isaac in sacrifice. His trust was not disappointed as God delivered him and Isaac and launched the history of Israel. The sins of the people kept them from living up to this pure faith and trust of Abraham. But the prophets promised that pure faith (daughter Zion) would be redeemed and find its way into Israel once and for all. The Church knows that daughter Zion, with pure faith and trust in God, is the Blessed Virgin Mary. She is the one who gave her complete “yes” to God’s plan at the Annunciation and become the Mother of God. She trusted all the way to the crucifixion of her Son and never wavered in that trust. Just like Abraham, Mary and her Son were ultimately delivered by God in the resurrection. Through Our Lady, the daughter of Zion, we all have access to God’s gracious gifts.

 

Lectio Divina

“The crowds asked John the Baptist, ‘What should we do?’”   — Luke 3:10

 Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.

Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?

These are the word of God. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. Are you able to picture the scene of John the Baptist in the desert with all of the people? What is it like? What question do you have for John? What may he have to say about what you need to do? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.

Does this gospel bring you comfort? Anxiety? Ask the Holy Spirit, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

 

The Catholic Way

John the Baptist witnessed to a godly life. He admonished many to change their conduct and consider how their actions affected others. When he counseled about sharing clothing and food, John was mentioning corporal works of mercy. There are seven general ways in which we go beyond justice and practice real love for people in need. Feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothed the naked, shelter the homeless, visit the sick and prisoners, bury the dead, give alms to the poor. People who are afflicted in these ways are suffering misery. When we love people in their misery that is called mercy. It is a particular kind of love that is meant to lift some of the burden of life and restore a person to joy or at least the possibility of finding joy. The corporal works of mercy remind us that when we are confronted by suffering it is real life breaking in. Seeing the suffering of others in not simply an inconvenience for us but an opportunity to make the fallen world a little better. When we act mercifully toward others we allow the Kingdom of God to break into their lives and make crooked ways straight.

 

The Friends of God: St. Peter Canisius

Patron saint of: Germany, the Catholic Press.
Feast Day December 21

St. Peter lived and ministered in the middle of the 16th century in Europe, mainly Germany, during the time of the Protestant Reformation. He was a prolific writer and teacher. Teaching in parishes, universities and writing books to revitalize the Catholic Faith in the heart of Protestantism. He lent much credibility to his teaching about the Catholic faith by personally caring for plague victims in Vienna. He became well-known for his catechism explaining the faith in ways accessible to the people. St. Peter also urged charity, not derision to Protestants, ultimately leading many back into the Church.

 Dear Doctor and Defender of the Church, to you the Master must have said: “Well done, composer of books which have taught and inspired countless persons in many lands.” Help those who compose catechisms to communicate the true teachings of Christ  in ways that can be understood by our contemporaries so that they will be moved to follow Jesus. Amen.

 

On Spiritual Joy

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

Ask the Lord for joyfulness.
Joy or cheerfulness is the second fruit of the Holy Spirit.

Think frequently of the Lord and thank him for the goods that we possess and hope to possess. For example, for the great good, namely the grace of God, that we possess and for the Paradise for which we hope. Let us go often to take, from the Angels and Blessed above, an air of joyfulness, thinking that from now on we are citizens of Heaven and fortifying ourselves in Christian hope. The merits connected with each good action and to the communion of saints.

 

 

December 9, 2018 – Second Sunday of Advent

Why Do We Do That?

Lord, have mercy — No Glory to God

One very recognizable feature of the Mass is the Gloria sung or recited right after the penitential rite (Lord, have mercy). “Glory to God in highest” was the refrain sung by the angels announcing the birth of Christ. We sing it together on Sundays and Solemn feast days to proclaim God’s greatness. During Advent and Lent, you may notice, the Gloria is omitted. The reason for this is to emphasize the penitential nature of the seasons, As the days leading into winter get darker and darker, so the season of Advent reminds us of life without God and how we must have hope in his coming to save us lest the final darkness of death overwhelm us, It is the unconscious dread of death that causes so much of the bad habits we form in life as an attempt to hide the inevitable from ourselves. But the season of Advent ultimately is a season to pull us out of the bad habits and into a true hope in the coming of Christ who destroys the darkness of death forever. Thus, we prepare our voices to sing the alleluia at Christmas with great joy and passion.

 

Catechesis: New Year of Grace

Advent begins the new year of grace. Time comes in two verities: Chronological (chronos) time represents the progression of events moving toward a particular point, namely, the second coming of Christ in glory. Quality time (Kairos) represents a deepening into the meaning of events. As chronos is represented by a straight line, Kairos is represented by concentric circles. The liturgical calendar represents both.

The 1st Sunday of Advent symbolizes Hope with the “Prophet’s Candle” reminding us that Jesus is coming.

The 2nd Sunday of Advent symbolizes Faith with the “Bethlehem Candle” reminding us of Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem.

The 3rd Sunday of Advent symbolizes Joy with the “Shepherd’s Candle” reminding us of the Joy the world experienced at the coming birth of Jesus.

The 4th Sunday of Advent symbolizes Peace with the “Angel’s Candle” reminding us of the message of the angels: “Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward Men.”

 

Lectio Divina

“I am confident of this, that the one who began a good work in you will continue to complete it until the day of Christ Jesus. ” — Philippians 1:6

Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.

Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?

These are the word of God. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions. What do you suppose is the Day of Christ? Who began good work in you? What is this good work? Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.

Does this bring you comfort? What do you think he means? Why would his word be the only thing that does not pass away? Ask the Holy Spirit, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

 

The Catholic Way

The initiation of the Christian life and salvation is Baptism. The great and holy sacrament removes the separation from God by original sin and makes one a child of the Holy One.

It is also the sacrament that enables one to worship God properly in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. To worship properly requires a “commission” from God so to speak. This commission or mark is received at Baptism. Being part of the family of God is not something one can give to oneself must it must be received as a gift gratefully. Gratitude is a fundamental Christian disposition. No child should be deprived of these marvelous gifts. To do so is to launch them into life with the idea that everything is “for the taking;” that is the disposition of the original sin. As a child of God through Baptism one discovers that real freedom happens within a community, within the Communion of Saints, not in isolation. We are called to a mutual dependence and affection with one another.

 

The Friends of God: St. John of the Cross

Patron saint of: Contemplatives and Mystics

Feast Day   December 14

John helped Teresa of Avila to reform the Carmelites to return to their contemplative roots. He wrote extraordinary Spanish poems to describe his mystical experiences. He had the courage to pursue fully the life of deep prayer and to face the fire of purification. Thus he found union with God in this life and left a “map” behind for Christians to follow.  John is considered one the greatest Spanish poets of all time. He described in his poetry the journey to God known as the dark night of the soul and the ultimate mystical marriage.

O Blessed Jesus, give me stillness of soul in You. Let Your mighty calmness reign in me. Rule me, O King of Gentleness, King of Peace. Amen.

 

Daily Offering

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri

Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

Almighty and Eternal God, I (name), although most unworthy in your sight, encouraged however by your compassion and infinite mercy, and by the desire of serving you, offer before the Most Holy Virgin Mary and all the Court of Heaven, to your Divine Majesty, this day and all my thoughts, words and actions in it. I humbly beg of your infinite goodness and mercy, by the Blood of Jesus Christ, that you choose to accept this offering in the odor of sweetness, and that as you have given me the grace to desire and to make this offering, so also you grant me the grace to fulfill it. Amen.

 

 

December 2, 2018 – First Sunday of Advent

Why Do We Do That?

Lord, have mercy — Kyrie Eleison

Every Holy Mass begins with the sign of the Cross because the Mass is out participation in that supreme event of God’s love. We pledge that we are acting now, not in our own name, but in the name of The Father, and of The Son, and of The Holy Spirit.

Then we acknowledge our sins and ask for pardon and peace. This is a crucial moment when we humbly admit that we do not live up to our mission of sacrificial love. We submit ourselves to our true judge, confident that God is reconciling us to Himself right now in Jesus Christ. We should, at this moment, pause and truly consider our particular sins and how they block us from proper love of God and neighbor. When we cry out, “Lord, have mercy,“ we are placing ourselves entirely into the Father’s hands. Our venial sins are forgiven at this part of the Mass. Do not miss the opportunity. Thus, we are prepared for the worship now to come.

The Mass is the celebration of God’s triumph over sin in the life, suffering, death and rising of Jesus. We call this the Paschal Mystery.

Catechesis: Advent

Advent is the first season of the Church year. We prepare for the coming of Christ in three ways: The first part of Advent is a focus on the second coming of   Jesus at the end of time to usher in the fullness of the Kingdom of God. This is the goal of all of history — to be with God forever. It constitutes the first part of Advent because as the goal of history, it shapes everything else in the calendar.

The next way prepare for the coming of Christ is by grace. He comes to us in the sacraments and in the whole life of the Church throughout the calendar in the feast days and seasons of the year.

The final part of Advent (beginning December 18th) is the preparation for the coming of Christ in nature at his birth. Christmas is an entire season of the Church year where we celebrate the beginning of grace in our world due to the birth of Jesus.

It is important to fully embrace Advent as a time of renewal, penance and deep longing for God. We are meant to wait for God, not leap ahead. It’s not Christmas yet.

Lectio Divina

“Beware that your hearts do not become drowsy.”   — Luke 21:34

 Ask the Holy Spirit to open your heart and mind to receive the word of God with reverence and joy.

Notice the thoughts and emotions within you. As you prayerfully consider this passage, are you able to identify what thoughts and feelings are generated?

These are the words of Jesus. Take time to consider them carefully. Clear from your mind all distractions, for Jesus says that all of those things will pass away in the end. Only his words remain forever. Take time right now to let these words touch your heart.

Does Jesus bring you comfort with these words, or are you unsettled? What do you think he means? Why would his word be the only thing that does not pass away? Ask Jesus, in your heart, to help you to know what this means for you and how best to apply it in your life.

The Catholic Way

Christ’s coming in glory at the end of history will usher in the last judgment. We are called by Jesus to be prepared, to be vigilant. As we consider all the ways to be prepared we should remember the Last Rites of the Church for ourselves and our loved ones. These rites provide the sacraments to strengthen us in the most important moment of our lives, namely, our death.

The last indulgence provided by the Church during the Last Rites is the Apostolic Pardon. This is given by the priest at the time of anointing and removes all stains of sin that may remain in a person. All the usual conditions for any plenary indulgence remain. This pardon can even remove the need for Purgatory.

The Church is so eager to aid every person in the journey of salvation that the Apostolic Pardon is available even when a priest is not available as long as a person has maintained some kind of minimal prayer throughout life. Two Hail Marys a day means a lot!

The Friends of God: St. Ambrose

Patron saint of beekeepers, beggars, learners, the city of Milan. Feast Day: December 7

In 390 AD, Ambrose confronted Roman Emperor Theodosius about the massacre of 7,000 people ordered in Thessalonica; refusing him entrance to the Cathedral and denying him Communion, Ambrose demanded the emperor repent publicly. His deep desire for the Eucharist brought Caesar to his knees in repentance. From that time on, the emperor stood with the people in the cathedral and no longer in the sanctuary with the priests as was custom. The courage of Ambrose brought about the first separation of Church and state.

O Lord, who hast mercy upon all, take away from me my sins, and mercifully kindle in me the fire of thy Holy Spirit. Take away from me the heart of stone, and give me a heart of flesh, a heart to love and adore Thee, a heart to delight in Thee, to follow and enjoy Thee, for the sake of Christ. Amen.

Entrustment to the Virgin Mary

by Venerable Bruno Lanteri, Founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary

O Mary, I choose you as my loving Mother, and choose to depend on you in all my actions. I wish to discern at every moment what is most pleasing to you that I may fulfill with all my strength what you chose for me. I desire to be totally available to your desire, and that my only desire be what you desire. I declare above all, that my firm purpose is to adore, love and praise Jesus Christ, the fruit of your most pure womb, with that spirit, that heart, and in that perfect way that you, most blessed Virgin, adore, love and praise him in heaven, with the intention of giving him the same glory that you constantly give him in heaven.

Be pleased, my sovereign Lady and most loving Mother, to accept me as your unworthy servant and son/daughter, and grant me the grace to imitate the angels in my readiness to follow your desires, and to love Jesus with your own most ardent heart. Amen.

The Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception
of Our Lady:
December 8